Freud, Jung, and Hall the Kingmaker

The Historic Expedition to America (1909)

by Saul Rosenzweig

Print edition

In stock

€39.95

In 1909, Freud and Jung sailed to the USA to lecture at Clark University, at the invitation of G Stanley Hall, the founder of the American Psychology Association. These lectures attracted many famous intellectual figures of the time, including William James.

During the trip, Freud, Jung, and James all stayed at Hall's house. This book provides a remarkably intimate inside look at these personalities, their ideas and their interaction, and their broader influence on the times.

Sources not hitherto available have been utilized, e.g., Freud's travel diary, on deposit in the restricted portion of the Library of Congress. Similar sources have been utilized for the contributions of Jung, Hall, and James. By examining the impact of Freud on James, an unrecognized romantic friendship during the last fifteen years of James's life has been disclosed.

From the Contents

  • The Visit: An exposition and idiodynamic analysis of the interrelated contributions of Freud, Jung, Hall, and James
  • The Letters: The complete correspondence of Freud and Hall is reproduced for the first time and historically annotated
  • The Lectures: A new translation is presented from the original German edition of the five lectures Freud delivered at Clark on the origin and development of psychoanalysis
  • A Synoptic Chronicle of events rounds out the volume

"This is a volume I would highly recommend for both entertainment and scholarly reading. It is a work whose scope and depth are so rich that one cannot hope to do justice to its thought-provoking content in a brief review. It will reward the reader with refreshing excursions through psychoanalytic history and biography."

Warren H Goodman, Great Neck, NY, for The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, p. 640 ff (1996).

"Saul Rosenzweig...has written an extraordinary rich and absorbent account of Freud’s only American trip that reveals unexpected patterns in the history of both psychoanalysis and American psychology.

"...the inclusion of the letters lends his book poetic unity and makes it a pleasure to read."

Perry Meisel, The New York Times, January 24, 1993.

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